Starbucks does blackout poetry. (Of course, without a link to this site or my book, or any context for what they’re doing.)

Filed under: ad agencies love blackout poetry

Starbucks does blackout poetry. (Of course, without a link to this site or my book, or any context for what they’re doing.)

Filed under: ad agencies love blackout poetry

2008 Lexus Ad using newspaper blackout poetry
2009 Microsoft campaign using newspaper blackout poetry

Brazilian ad agency uses blackout poetry to sell soap and deodorant

The agency Salve recently did a campaign focused entirely around blackout poetry for their client, Natura.

Here’s a bad Google translation of the messaging:

Tododia has hidden poetry. At each step of the routine. In every sentence, every gesture. Just be there to feel the pulsing possibilities. Natura invited five women, five poets to see the unusual in the ordinary. Finding the poetry of the newspaper every day. And invites you to participate in this healthy exercise in discovery.

Probably no coincidence that I’m headed to Brazil this weekend to talk about what’s stealing like an artist and what’s stealing like an ad agency.

Austin

austinkleon:

For Journalists Who Seek Out Hidden Things, a More Visible Brand

The ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners designs a very newspaper blackout-like logo for The Center for Investigative Reporting:


  The idea for the campaign was suggested by “Broken Shield,” a series by California Watch that investigated problems at centers for the developmentally disabled. When reporters received documents they had requested from state officials, “the documents were entirely redacted,” Mr. Bronstein said, “not just the words but the margins.”
  
  “Rich took that redaction notion,” he added, “to deliver the message that we are the antidote to redaction.”
  
  The center’s new logo looks like a redacted document, with everything unreadable except for five words: “the,” “center for,” “investigative” and “reporting.” The logo will appear in numerous places like the center’s Web site, video clips and movie-style posters that promote the center’s reporting.
  
  …The logo is meant to symbolize that “you have to go beyond that blacked-out material to find the truth,” Mr. Silverstein said in a separate phone interview.


I don’t have a comment except, I named the book Steal Like An Artist, not Steal Like An Ad Agency.

(thx @misterdamrauer)



Also: CIR! We have some sweet office art that would match your new identity. Hit us up.

austinkleon:

For Journalists Who Seek Out Hidden Things, a More Visible Brand

The ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners designs a very newspaper blackout-like logo for The Center for Investigative Reporting:

The idea for the campaign was suggested by “Broken Shield,” a series by California Watch that investigated problems at centers for the developmentally disabled. When reporters received documents they had requested from state officials, “the documents were entirely redacted,” Mr. Bronstein said, “not just the words but the margins.”

“Rich took that redaction notion,” he added, “to deliver the message that we are the antidote to redaction.”

The center’s new logo looks like a redacted document, with everything unreadable except for five words: “the,” “center for,” “investigative” and “reporting.” The logo will appear in numerous places like the center’s Web site, video clips and movie-style posters that promote the center’s reporting.

…The logo is meant to symbolize that “you have to go beyond that blacked-out material to find the truth,” Mr. Silverstein said in a separate phone interview.

I don’t have a comment except, I named the book Steal Like An Artist, not Steal Like An Ad Agency.

(thx @misterdamrauer)

Also: CIR! We have some sweet office art that would match your new identity. Hit us up.