Blackout Poem exercise

The folks at Duarte Design try out some blackout poetry

During a lunch break dedicated to enjoying “Analog Time” we gathered newspapers, magazines, photo copies of novels, lots of Sharpies, and started creating by subtracting. By the end of the hour, we had some incredible poems, and a solid buzz from the Sharpie fumes. Each of the poems was wildly different, even when they were created from the same passage of text. Some were hilarious, some were heartwarming, and at least one was pretty racy.

Poring over which words to omit, I realized that creating blackout poetry is similar to creating a great presentation. You start with a lot of stuff, you study it all and make decisions on what to eliminate and what to highlight, and at the end you are left with the few essential elements that work together to tell a story.

WritersParis:


  Blackout poets at work while @austinkleon drops knowledge


See more classrooms trying out blackouts
austinkleon:

How to get one of my newspaper blackout prints for less than $20

As many of you may know, 20x200 is down, and I don’t have time right now to release any new prints in the store, so here’s a cheap option that makes a good valentine:

Buy a copy of Newspaper Blackout and tear out your favorite poem
Obtain a cheap 8x10 frame w/ a 5x7 matte, maybe from IKEA.
Frame your poem.
Of course, the same method will work with any of your favorite illustrations from Steal Like An Artist — just substitute a square frame with a 5x5 matte.

Enjoy! And join my mailing list or follow me on Twitter to find out when I have new art for sale.

austinkleon:

How to get one of my newspaper blackout prints for less than $20

As many of you may know, 20x200 is down, and I don’t have time right now to release any new prints in the store, so here’s a cheap option that makes a good valentine:

  1. Buy a copy of Newspaper Blackout and tear out your favorite poem
  2. Obtain a cheap 8x10 frame w/ a 5x7 matte, maybe from IKEA.
  3. Frame your poem.

Of course, the same method will work with any of your favorite illustrations from Steal Like An Artist — just substitute a square frame with a 5x5 matte.

Enjoy! And join my mailing list or follow me on Twitter to find out when I have new art for sale.

McSweeney’s is having a kind of blackout contest


  Use scrap paper to block out words and letters until you’ve “discovered” a secret message in the cover. Your message might be a sentence, a phrase, or even a single word.

McSweeney’s is having a kind of blackout contest

Use scrap paper to block out words and letters until you’ve “discovered” a secret message in the cover. Your message might be a sentence, a phrase, or even a single word.

Newspaper blackout poetry class at Brooklyn Brainery

It was last night, but never fear: you can learn how to make blackout poetry in Newspaper Blackout.

Newspaper blackout poetry class at Brooklyn Brainery

It was last night, but never fear: you can learn how to make blackout poetry in Newspaper Blackout.

Says reader Tabinda:

an afternoon in my favourite coffee shop led to this

See more poems in progress.

Says reader Tabinda:

an afternoon in my favourite coffee shop led to this

See more poems in progress.

laitylodge:


  Afternoon blackout poetry in the Cody Center

laitylodge:

Afternoon blackout poetry in the Cody Center

Blackouts by MissJLud's students

Blackouts by MissJLud's students

Another classroom hard at work on blackout poetry! Love seeing students in action.

Another classroom hard at work on blackout poetry! Love seeing students in action.

For those of you looking for more blackout poetry on Tumblr, follow this tag. It’s been so much fun to see the form grow outside of this blog and the book. —AK

When my kids get ready to make art, they reach for the newspaper. Cheap and always available, it’s our household’s all-purpose work surface for messy creativity. And when the kids are done, their creations proudly drying on the kitchen counter, the paint-spattered, goop-glopped newspaper pages spread out to protect the table are often striking to look at in their own right…
Carlo Rotella